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Nickdfresh
07-28-2005, 03:47 AM
July 28, 2005

Pakistan Connection Seen in Taliban's New Tactics
By Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer

ASADABAD, Afghanistan Telephone and power lines haven't reached the villages clinging to the craggy mountainsides of Kunar province. Digital phones and computer chips are even further beyond the shepherds' imaginations.

So when sophisticated bombs detonated by long-range cordless phones began blowing up under U.S. and Afghan military vehicles on mountain tracks, investigators knew they had to search elsewhere for the masterminds.

Afghan officials immediately focused on nearby Pakistan and its military, whose Inter-Services Intelligence agency helped create the Taliban in the early 1990s and provided training and equipment to help the Muslim extremists win control over most of the country.

Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf joined the Bush administration's war on terrorism and publicly turned against the Taliban immediately after the Sept. 11 attacks. But Afghan officials allege that Taliban and allied fighters who fled to Pakistan after the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001 are learning new, more lethal tactics from the Pakistani military at numerous training bases.

"Pakistan is lying," said Lt. Sayed Anwar, acting head of Afghanistan's counter-terrorism department. "We have very correct reports from their areas. We have our intelligence agents inside Pakistan's border as well.

"If Pakistan tells the truth, the problems will stop in Afghanistan. They say they are friends of Americans, and yet they order these people to kill Americans."

At least 38 U.S. troops have died from hostile fire in Afghanistan this year, higher than the annual combat death toll for any year since the invasion.

Musharraf has denied that his military supports the Taliban or any other Afghan insurgents and the Bush administration and U.S. military spokesmen continue to praise Pakistan's role in combating terrorism.

Pakistan's army recently added 4,000 troops to the 70,000 soldiers patrolling the rugged, nearly 1,500-mile, border between the countries in what it says is a determined effort to stop infiltrations of Afghanistan.

Pakistani Maj. Gen. Shaukat Sultan, a military spokesman, said it was ridiculous to suggest that Pakistan had a secret operation to train insurgents to build complex electronic bombs.

"This is just a figment of some absurd mind, nothing else," Sultan said.

High-tech bombs similar to those being found in Afghanistan have killed Pakistani soldiers too, he said. More than 250 Pakistani troops have died in border operations in the last year, Sultan said.

"We haven't found any sanctuary, so far, where such items probably could be made," he said, adding that Pakistan's military didn't know where the sophisticated bomb-making technology was coming from.

Anwar, the Afghan official, who has worked in intelligence for 27 years, acknowledged that there was no smoking gun linking insurgents in Afghanistan to Pakistan's military intelligence.



Yet despite the Pakistani military's assertions, increasing numbers of guerrillas are crossing into eastern and southern Afghanistan, Anwar and other Afghan officials said.

"Last year, the enemy wasn't able to attack our checkpoints or plant so many mines," Anwar said. "This year, they have become very strong."

Anwar said reports from intelligence agents across the border and 50 captured prisoners describe an extensive network of militant training camps in areas of Pakistan's federally administered North Waziristan tribal area where government forces are firmly in control.

Tauda China, a village in the area, which is home to Pushtun tribes, is the site of one camp where Inter-Services Intelligence agents trained militants, Anwar said. He alleged that there were as many as six other camps in the surrounding valley, which is closed to outsiders and guarded by Pakistani troops and armed Afghans.

"Our agents have been there," Anwar said. "They tried to enter the valley and the soldiers didn't allow them."

Zulfiqar Ali, a Pakistani journalist who freelances for the Los Angeles Times, recently reported that at least some training camps that were closed on Musharraf's orders have been reopened.

Link (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-pakban28jul28,0,1838806.story?track=tottext)

Nickdfresh
07-28-2005, 03:52 AM
Bush Is Pakistan's Pal

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2005

News Analysis

http://wwwimage.cbsnews.com/images/2004/05/07/image616071l.gif
(Photo: AP)

We have cozied up to Pakistan for more than three years as it freely allowed the operation of the most extravagantly irresponsible nuclear arms bazaar the world has ever seen.

(The Nation) This column from The Nation was written by Robert Scheer.Trying to follow the U.S. policy on the proliferation of nuclear weapons is like watching a three-card monte game on a city street corner. Except the stakes are higher.

The announcement Friday that the United States is authorizing the sale to Pakistan of F-16 fighter jets capable of delivering nuclear warheads -- and thereby escalating the region's nuclear arms race -- is the latest example of how the most important issue on the planet is being bungled by the Bush Administration.

Consider this dizzying series of Bush II-era actions:

We have thrown away thousands of Iraqi and American lives and billions of U.S. taxpayer dollars after crying wolf on Iraq's long-defunct nuclear weapons program and now expect the world to believe similar scary stories about neighboring Iran.

We have cozied up to Pakistan for more than three years as it freely allowed the operation of the most extravagantly irresponsible nuclear arms bazaar the world has ever seen.

We sabotaged negotiations with North Korea by telling allies that Pyongyang had supplied nuclear material to Libya, even though the Bush Administration knew that the country of origin of those shipments was our "ally," Pakistan.

Now, Lockheed Martin has been saved from closing its F-16 production line by the White House decision to lift the arms embargo on Pakistan and allow the sale. The decision, which ends a 1990 embargo put in place by the President's father in reprisal for Pakistan's development of a nuclear arsenal, is especially odd at a time when we are berating European nations for considering lifting their arms embargo on China.

The White House says the F-16s are a reward to Islamabad for its help in disrupting terrorism networks, despite a decade of Pakistan's strong support of Al Qaeda and the Taliban government in Afghanistan.

Yet Pakistan's ruling generals could be excused for believing that Washington is not seriously concerned about the proliferation of nuclear weapons. How else to explain invading a country -- Iraq -- that didn't possess nukes, didn't sell nuclear technology to unstable nations and didn't maintain an unholy alliance with al Qaeda -- and then turning around and giving the plum prizes of U.S. military ingenuity to the country that did?

Even as the Bush Administration continues to confront Iran over its alleged nuclear weapons program, Islamabad has admitted that Pakistani nuclear weapons trafficker Abdul Qadeer Khan -- the father of his nation's nuclear bomb -- provided Iran with the centrifuges essential to such a program. Further, new evidence reveals that Khan marketed to Iran and Libya not only the materials needed for a nuclear bomb but the engineering competence to actually make one.

Pakistan President Gen. Pervez Musharraf insists Khan was running his nuclear smuggling operation under the radar of the military government that brought Musharraf to power. And although this is a highly implausible claim given the reach of the military's power and the scope of the operation, the White House has found it convenient to buy it hook, line and sinker -- all the better to remarket Pakistan to the American people as a war-on-terrorism ally.

While Pakistan was receiving such heaping helpings of benefit of the doubt, North Korea became the Bush Administration's scapegoat for the rapid nuclear proliferation happening on its watch, according to the Washington Post. "In an effort to increase pressure on North Korea, the Bush administration told its Asian allies in briefings earlier this year that Pyongyang had exported nuclear material to Libya," wrote the Post. "But that is not what U.S. intelligence reported, according to two officials with detailed knowledge of the transaction." Sources told the paper that "Pakistan's role as both the buyer and the seller [of uranium hexafluoride] was concealed to cover up the part played by Washington's partner."

One result of the United States shortsightedly pulling this fast one has been the collapse of multilateral nonproliferation talks with Pyongyang. Yet in the long term, the cost is much greater: a dramatic erosion of trust in US statements on nuclear proliferation.

From Iraq to Iran, North Korea to Pakistan, the Bush Administration has pulled so many con jobs that it is difficult for anybody to take it seriously. Unfortunately, though, the proliferation of nuclear weapons is as serious as it gets.

Link (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/04/01/opinion/main684768.shtml)
Robert Scheer, a Nation contributing editor, is also a contributing editor and columnist for the Los Angeles Times.

Nickdfresh
07-28-2005, 03:55 AM
So we're sending them weapons and they're killing our troops? Explain this one Neo Con shitbags!:mad:

LoungeMachine
07-28-2005, 03:58 AM
Originally posted by Nickdfresh
So we're sending them weapons and they're killing our troops? Explain this one Neo Con shitbags!:mad:

dd?

warpig?


Care to spin this one?

:mad:

Cathedral
07-28-2005, 04:55 AM
That's fucked the hell up, man.

To be totally honest, once you back away from supporting a political party in this country, it is amazing the things you actually see and begin to understand.

I kind of feel like a spy for a football team who was sent to get the other teams playbook.
Well, now i'm reading them both so i can recognize the plays in the future, if there is a future.

FORD
07-28-2005, 10:07 AM
Pakistan has been in on it all along. If Osama Bin Laden is still alive, he's in Pakistan, and not even the BCE will bother to argue otherwise. They'll just make up some excuse about Musharraf not being able to control "part of that country".

Must be the Pakistan equivalent of the "blue states", right? :rolleyes:

Nickdfresh
07-28-2005, 12:28 PM
Why don't we abduct and rape some Pakistani intelligence officers' children to get information from their parents?

LoungeMachine
07-28-2005, 12:49 PM
Originally posted by FORD
Pakistan has been in on it all along. If Osama Bin Laden is still alive, he's in Pakistan, and not even the BCE will bother to argue otherwise. They'll just make up some excuse about Musharraf not being able to control "part of that country".

Must be the Pakistan equivalent of the "blue states", right? :rolleyes:

If you'll recall GOSS himself stated he KNEW OBL was in Pakistan, but we wont go in because they're a "Sovereign" nation:rolleyes:

The irony is clouded only by the hypocrisy :rolleyes:

worldbefree
07-28-2005, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by Cathedral
To be totally honest, once you back away from supporting a political party in this country, it is amazing the things you actually see and begin to understand.

Consider this in regards to a article I posted yesterday.

Fact: I am writing to draw to your attention to a provision in the Energy Conference Report that raises serious procedural and substantive concerns. At its essence, this provision is a $1.5 billion giveaway to the oil industry, Halliburton, and Sugar Land, Texas. The provision was inserted into the energy legislation after the conference was closed, so members of the conference committee had no opportunity to consider or reject this measure. Before the final energy legislation is brought to the House floor, this provision should be deleted.

The provision was inserted by Tom Delay.

Fact: Republicans as well as Democrats are paying record prices at the pump for a gallon of gas. The national average is $228.9/gallon.

Fact: The net income of the top oil companies will total $230 billion in 2005

Fact: Republicans schmucks support this congressman. Which means they work over 100+ days a year just to pay federal and local taxes so that oil companies can recieve massive giveaways in tax payer dollars. They then pay record prices for gasoline to fill the coffers of large oil companies to the tune of $230 million dollars.

Explain to me how you can defend these leaders who screw you over at every turn. You work to subsidize large multi-national corporations, then you give them more of your money everytime you pull up to the pump and put $50 dollars of fuel into your gas guzzling SVU.

Go on and support these characters, It only proves how clueless you really are.