Cheney's top aide quits after indictment

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  • Hardrock69
    DIAMOND STATUS
    • Feb 2005
    • 21888

    Cheney's top aide quits after indictment



    WASHINGTON (CNN) -- I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, resigned on Friday after a federal grand jury indicted him on charges related to the CIA leak investigation.

    Libby was indicted on one count of obstruction of justice, two counts of perjury and two counts of making false statements, court documents show.

    The indictments were not related to the actual leak of operative Valerie Plame Wilson's name. (Read the full text of the indictment)

    These indictments are the first in a nearly two-year investigation. Special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald has scheduled a 2 p.m. ET news conference. (Watch possible ramifications of an indictment -- 2:49)

    A news release by Fitzgerald said Libby allegedly lied "about how and when in 2003 he learned and subsequently disclosed to reporters then-classified information concerning the employment of Valerie Wilson by the Central Intelligence Agency."

    It said Libby "lied to FBI agents who interviewed him" in October and November 2003; committed perjury "while testifying under oath before the grand jury" in March 2004; and "engaged in obstruction of justice by impeding the grand jury's investigation into the unauthorized disclosure -- or 'leaking' -- of Valerie Wilson's affiliation with the CIA to various reporters in the spring of 2003."

    "When citizens testify before grand juries they are required to tell the truth," Fitzgerald said in the statement. "Without the truth, our criminal justice system cannot serve our nation or its citizens."

    There was no immediate response from Libby to the charges. His attorneys have previously denied that he was guilty of any criminal conduct.

    Meanwhile, President Bush's top political strategist Karl Rove will not be indicted Friday by the federal grand jury investigating the leak, sources close to the investigation tell CNN. But, the sources said, Rove is not out of legal jeopardy as the matter is still under investigation. (Full story)

    Lawyers involved in the case have told CNN that Fitzgerald is focusing on whether Rove committed perjury. Rove testified four times in front of the grand jury.
    Impact of indictments

    David Gergen, a former adviser to presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Clinton, told CNN's "Larry King Live" that indictments in the case could have an enormous impact on the Iraq war.

    "Because if there are indictments, it will not only be people close to the president, the vice president of the United States, but they will raise questions about whether criminal acts were perpetrated to help get the country into war."
    'No decision'

    Rove's attorney Robert Luskin issued a statement Friday that Fitzgerald "has advised Mr. Rove that he has made no decision about whether or not to bring charges."

    "Mr. Rove will continue to cooperate fully with the Special Counsel's efforts to complete the investigation," Luskin's statement said. "We are confident that when the Special Counsel finishes his work, he will conclude that Mr. Rove has done nothing wrong."

    As Rove departed his home in Washington Friday morning, he told reporters, "I am going to have a great Friday and a fantastic weekend and hope you do too."

    Libby's indictment came at a time when Bush's approval ratings already are at a low ebb.

    This week alone the president's embattled Supreme Court nominee, Harriet Miers, withdrew, and the number of U.S. military deaths in the Iraq war surpassed 2,000.

    Bush suggested at the beginning of the investigation that he would fire anyone on his staff who was involved in the leak.

    He appeared to set a higher standard in July, saying, "If someone committed a crime, they will no longer work in my administration." (Full story)

    The event that triggered the legal and political quagmire that has put the White House on edge was a syndicated newspaper column by Robert Novak, published on July 14, 2003, about Joe Wilson.

    A week earlier, Wilson, a retired U.S. diplomat, publicly claimed that Bush administration officials, intent on building a case to depose Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, hyped unsupported claims that Hussein sought to buy uranium for nuclear weapons from Niger.

    Novak, who also is a CNN contributor, was writing about the CIA's decision to send Wilson to the African nation in February 2002 to investigate the claims, which later wound up in Bush's 2003 State of Union address.

    About midway through his column, Novak noted that Wilson "never worked for the CIA, but his wife, Valerie Plame, is an agency operative on weapons of mass destruction."

    An angry Wilson accused administration officials of deliberately leaking his wife's identity as a CIA operative -- thus ending her career as an undercover agent -- to retaliate against him for going public with his criticism.

    Both Rove and Libby have denied leaking Plame's name.

    Deliberately disclosing the identity of a CIA operative can be a crime, and Fitzgerald, the U.S. attorney in Chicago, was named in September 2003 as a special prosecutor to investigate after then-Attorney General John Ashcroft recused his office to avoid any conflict of interest.
    Reporters subpoenaed

    Trying to pin down the details of discussions between administration officials and reporters about Plame, Fitzgerald subpoenaed Washington journalists.

    Two of them -- Judith Miller of The New York Times and Matthew Cooper of Time magazine -- sought a ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court to protect their confidential sources but the court refused to take up the cases.

    Facing jail for contempt of court, Cooper testified after accepting a waiver of his confidentiality pledge from a source -- who turned out to be Rove.

    Cooper later disclosed that Rove told him in July 2003 that Plame was a CIA agent involved in weapons of mass destruction issues, although Rove never used her name and never indicated she had covert status.

    Cooper said he later asked Libby "if he had heard anything about Wilson's wife sending her husband to Niger," and Libby said he had, which Cooper said he took as confirmation of Rove's information.

    Miller went to jail for 85 days but was released after her source -- Libby -- assured her that he had no objections to her testifying.

    Dick Cheney's name surfaced in the case earlier this week. The New York Times reported that notes of a conversation indicated Cheney gave Plame's name to Libby ---which appears to contradict Libby's grand jury testimony that he first heard Plame's name from reporters.

    Cheney's office had no comment, and the White House would neither confirm nor deny the Times report.

    CNN's Kelli Arena, Dana Bash, John King and Kevin Bohn contributed to this report.
  • FORD
    ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

    • Jan 2004
    • 58908

    #2
    Full text of the indictment can be read here
    Eat Us And Smile

    Cenk For America 2024!!

    Justice Democrats


    "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

    Comment

    • FORD
      ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

      • Jan 2004
      • 58908

      #3
      **Fitzgerald Press Release**

      Office of Special Counsel
      Patrick J. Fitzgerald
      Chicago Office: Dirksen Federal Building Washington Office: Bond Federal Building
      Special Counsel 219 South Dearborn Street, Fifth Floor 1400 New York Avenue NW, Ninth Floor
      Chicago, Illinois 60604 Washington, DC 20530
      Please address all correspondence to the Washington Office

      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE PRESS CONTACT:
      FRIDAY OCTOBER 28, 2005 Randall Samborn (312) 613-6700
      WWW.USDOJ.GOV/USAO/ILN/OSC (312) 353-5318

      WHITE HOUSE OFFICIAL I. LEWIS LIBBY INDICTED ON OBSTRUCTION OF
      JUSTICE, FALSE STATEMENT AND PERJURY CHARGES RELATING TO LEAK
      OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION REVEALING CIA OFFICER’S IDENTITY

      WASHINGTON – Senior White House official I. Lewis Libby was indicted today on
      obstruction of justice, false statement and perjury charges for allegedly lying about how and when in
      2003 he learned and subsequently disclosed to reporters then-classified information concerning the
      employment of Valerie Wilson by the Central Intelligence Agency. Libby was charged with one count
      of obstruction of justice, two counts of perjury and two counts of making false statements in a five-count
      indictment returned today by a federal grand jury as its term expired, announced Justice Department
      Special Counsel Patrick J. Fitzgerald.

      The defendant, also known as “Scooter” Libby, has served since January 20, 2001, as Assistant
      to the President, Chief of Staff to the Vice President, and Assistant to the Vice President for National
      Security Affairs. Libby, 55, will be arraigned at a later date in U.S. District Court for the District of
      Columbia.

      The charges allege that Libby lied to FBI agents who interviewed him on October 14 and
      November 26, 2003; committed perjury while testifying under oath before the grand jury on March 5
      and March 24, 2004; and engaged in obstruction of justice by impeding the grand jury’s investigation
      into the unauthorized disclosure – or “leaking” – of Valerie Wilson’s affiliation with the CIA to various
      reporters in the spring of 2003.

      Beginning in late May 2003, Libby allegedly began acquiring information about a 2002 trip to
      the African country of Niger by Joseph Wilson, a former United States Ambassador and career State
      Department official, to investigate allegations concerning efforts by the former government of Iraq to
      acquire uranium yellowcake, a processed form of uranium ore. The CIA decided on its own initiative
      to send Wilson to Niger after an inquiry to the CIA by the Vice President concerning certain intelligence
      reporting. Wilson orally reported his findings to the CIA upon his return. Subsequently, Libby allegedly
      lied about information he discussed about the CIA employment of Wilson’s wife, Valerie Plame Wilson,
      in conversations Libby had in June and July 2003 with three news reporters – Tim Russert of NBC News,
      Matt Cooper of Time magazine, and Judith Miller of The New York Times.

      Prior to July 14, 2003, Valerie Wilson’s employment status was classified. Prior to that date, her
      affiliation with the CIA was not common knowledge outside the intelligence community. Disclosure
      of classified information about an individual’s employment by the CIA has the potential to damage the
      national security in ways that range from preventing that individual’s future use in a covert capacity, to
      compromising intelligence-gathering methods and operations, and endangering the safety of CIA
      employees and those who deal with them, the indictment states.

      “When citizens testify before grand juries they are required to tell the truth,” Mr. Fitzgerald said.
      “Without the truth, our criminal justice system cannot serve our nation or its citizens. The requirement
      to tell the truth applies equally to all citizens, including persons who hold high positions in government.
      In an investigation concerning the compromise of a CIA officer’s identity, it is especially important that
      grand jurors learn what really happened. The indictment returned today alleges that the efforts of the
      grand jury to investigate such a leak were obstructed when Mr. Libby lied about how and when he
      learned and subsequently disclosed classified information about Valerie Wilson,” he added.
      Mr. Fitzgerald announced the charges with John C. Eckenrode, Special Agent-in-Charge of the
      Philadelphia Field Office of the FBI and the lead agent in the investigation. The Washington Field
      Office and the Inspection Division of the FBI assisted in the investigation.

      The indictment alleges that Libby had frequent access to classified information and frequently
      spoke with officials of the U.S. intelligence community and other government officials regarding
      sensitive national security matters. With his responsibilities for national security matters, Libby held
      security clearances giving him access to classified information. Libby was obligated by federal criminal
      statute, regulations, executive orders, and a written non-disclosure agreement not to disclose classified
      information to unauthorized persons, and to properly safeguard classified information against
      unauthorized disclosure.

      According to the indictment, on September 26, 2003, the Department of Justice and the FBI
      began a criminal investigation into the possible unauthorized disclosure of classified information
      regarding Valerie Wilson’s CIA affiliation to various reporters in the spring of 2003. In January 2004,
      the grand jury investigation began examining possible violations of criminal laws prohibiting disclosing
      the identity of covert intelligence personnel (The Intelligence Identities Protection Act), improperly
      disclosing national defense information, making false statements to government agents, and perjury. A
      major focus of the grand jury investigation was to determine which government officials had disclosed
      to the media prior to July 14, 2003, information concerning Valerie Wilson’s CIA affiliation, and the
      nature, timing, extent, and purpose of such disclosures, as well as whether any official made such a
      disclosure knowing that Valerie Wilson’s employment by the CIA was classified information.

      The over-arching obstruction of justice count alleges that while testifying under oath before the
      grand jury on March 5 and March 24 2004, Libby knowingly and corruptly endeavored to influence,
      obstruct and impede the grand jury’s investigation by misleading and deceiving the grand jury as to
      when, and the manner and means by which, he acquired, and subsequently disclosed to the media,
      information concerning the employment of Valerie Wilson by the CIA. The obstruction count alleges
      that Libby made the following materially false and intentionally misleading statements:

      < When Libby spoke with Tim Russert of NBC on or about July 10, 2003, Russert
      asked Libby if Libby knew that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA, and told
      Libby that all the reporters knew it; and Libby was surprised to hear that Wilson’s
      wife worked for the CIA; when, in fact, Libby knew Russert did not ask Libby
      if Libby knew that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA, nor did Russert tell Libby
      that all the reporters knew it. And, at the time of this conversation, Libby was
      well aware that Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA and Libby had participated in
      multiple prior conversations concerning this topic;

      < Libby advised Matt Cooper of Time magazine on or about July 12, 2003, that he
      had heard that other reporters were saying that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA,
      and further advised him that Libby did not know whether this assertion was true;
      when, in fact, Libby did not advise Cooper during that conversation that Libby
      had heard other reporters were saying that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA, nor
      did Libby advise him that Libby did not know whether this assertion was true.
      Rather, Libby confirmed to Cooper, without qualification, that Libby had heard
      that Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA; and

      < Libby advised Judith Miller of The New York Times on or about July 12, 2003,
      that he had heard that other reporters were saying that Wilson’s wife worked for
      the CIA but Libby did not know whether that assertion was true; when, in fact,
      Libby did not advise Miller during that conversation that Libby had heard other
      reporters were saying that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA, nor did Libby
      advise her that Libby did not know whether this assertion was true.
      Among the events leading up to these conversations, on January 28, 2003, President Bush
      delivered his State of the Union address which included sixteen words asserting that “The British
      government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from
      Africa.”

      On May 6, 2003, The New York Times published a column by Nicholas Kristof which disputed
      the accuracy of the “sixteen words” in the State of the Union address. The column reported that,
      following a request from the Vice President’s office for an investigation of allegations that Iraq sought
      to buy uranium from Niger, an unnamed former ambassador was sent to Niger in 2002 to investigate the
      allegations. According to the column, the ambassador reported back to the CIA and State Department
      in early 2002 that the allegations were unequivocally wrong and based on forged documents.
      According to the indictment, beginning in late May and throughout June, Libby participated in
      multiple conversations concerning Valerie Wilson’s employment by the CIA, including on the following
      occasions:

      • on or about May 29, 2003, in the White House, Libby asked an Undersecretary
      of State for information concerning the unnamed ambassador’s travel to Niger.
      The Undersecretary thereafter directed the State Department’s Bureau of
      Intelligence and Research to prepare a report concerning the ambassador and his
      trip. The Undersecretary provided Libby with interim oral reports in late May
      and early June 2003, and advised Libby that Wilson was the former ambassador
      who took the trip;

      • on or about June 9, 2003, a number of classified documents from the CIA were
      faxed to the Office of the Vice President to the personal attention of Libby and
      another person in the Vice President’s office. The documents, which bore
      classification markings, discussed, among other things, Wilson and his trip to
      Niger, but did not mention Wilson by name. After receiving these documents,
      Libby and one or more other persons in the Vice President’s office handwrote the
      names “Wilson” and “Joe Wilson” on the documents;

      • on or about June 11 or 12, 2003, Libby was orally advised by the Undersecretary
      of State that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA and that State Department
      personnel were saying that Wilson’s wife was involved in the organization of his
      trip;

      • on or about June 11, 2003, Libby was informed by a senior officer of the CIA that
      Wilson’s wife was employed by the CIA and was believed to be responsible for
      sending Wilson on the trip;

      • prior to June 12, 2003, Washington Post reporter Walter Pincus contacted the
      Office of the Vice President about a story he was writing about Wilson’s trip.
      Libby participated in discussions in the Vice President’s office concerning how
      to respond to Pincus;

      • on or about June 12, 2003, Libby was advised by the Vice President of the United
      States that Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA in the Counterproliferation Division.
      Libby understood that the Vice President had learned this information from the
      CIA;

      • on or about June 14, 2003, Libby met with a CIA briefer and expressed
      displeasure that CIA officials were making comments to reporters critical of the
      Vice President’s office, and discussed with the briefer, among other things, “Joe
      Wilson” and his wife “Valerie Wilson,” in the context of Wilson’s trip to Niger;

      • shortly after publication on or about June 19, 2003, of an article in The New
      Republic magazine online entitled “The First Casualty: The Selling of the Iraq
      War,” Libby spoke by telephone with his then Principal Deputy and discussed the
      article. That official asked Libby whether information about Wilson’s trip could
      be shared with the press to rebut the allegations that the Vice President had sent
      Wilson. Libby responded that there would be complications at the CIA in
      disclosing that information publicly, and that he could not discuss the matter on
      a non-secure telephone line; and

      • on or about June 23, 2003, Libby met with Judith Miller of The New York Times.
      Libby was critical of the CIA and disparaged what he termed “selective leaking”
      by the CIA concerning intelligence matters. In discussing the CIA’s handling of
      Wilson’s trip to Niger, Libby informed Miller Wilson’s wife might work at a
      bureau of the CIA.

      On July 6, 2003, The New York Times published an opinion article by Joseph Wilson entitled
      “What I Didn’t Find in Africa.” On the same day, the Washington Post published an article about
      Wilson’s 2002 trip to Niger, which was based partially on an interview of Wilson, and he was a guest
      on the television program “Meet the Press.” In the article he wrote, as well as in the print and broadcast
      interviews of him, Wilson asserted, among other things, that he had taken a trip to Niger at the request
      of the CIA in February 2002 to investigate allegations that Iraq has sought or obtained uranium
      yellowcake from Niger, and that he doubted Iraq had obtained uranium from Niger recently, for a
      number of reasons. Wilson said that he believed, based on his understanding of government procedures,
      that the Vice President’s office was advised of the results of his trip.

      Following Wilson’s July 6, 2003 statements, according to the indictment, Libby engaged in the
      following actions:

      • on or about July 7, 2003, Libby had lunch with the then White House Press
      Secretary and advised that individual that Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA,
      noting that such information was not widely known;

      • on or about the morning of July 8, 2003, Libby met with Miller of The New York
      Times. When the conversation turned to the subject of Joseph Wilson, Libby
      asked that the information he provided on the topic of Wilson be attributed to a
      “former Hill staffer” rather than to a “senior administration official,” as had been
      the understanding regarding other information that Libby provided to Miller
      during this meeting. Libby then discussed with Miller Wilson’s trip and
      criticized the CIA reporting concerning Wilson’s trip. During this discussion,
      Libby advised Miller of his belief that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA;

      • also on or about July 8, 2003, Libby met with the Counsel to the Vice President
      in an anteroom outside the Vice President’s office. During their brief
      conversation, Libby asked the individual what paperwork there would be at the
      CIA if an employee’s spouse undertook an overseas trip;

      • no earlier than June 2003 but on or before July 8, 2003, the Assistant to the Vice
      President for Public Affairs learned from another government official that
      Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA and advised Libby of this information;

      • on or about July 10, 2003, Libby spoke to NBC’s Russert to complain about press
      coverage of Libby by an MSNBC reporter. Libby did not discuss Wilson’s wife
      with Russert;

      • on or about July 10 or July 11, 2003, Libby spoke to a senior White House
      official (“Official A”) who advised Libby of a conversation Official A had earlier
      that week with columnist Robert Novak in which Wilson’s wife was discussed
      as a CIA employee involved in Wilson’s trip. Libby was advised by Official A
      that Novak would be writing a story about Wilson’s wife;

      • on or about July 12, 2003, Libby flew with the Vice President and others to and
      from Norfolk, Va., on Air Force Two. On his return trip, Libby discussed with
      other officials aboard the plane what Libby should say in response to certain
      pending media inquiries, including questions from Time’s Cooper;

      • on or about July 12, 2003, in the afternoon, Libby spoke by telephone to Cooper,
      who asked whether Libby had heard that Wilson’s wife was involved in sending
      Wilson on the trip to Niger. Libby confirmed to Cooper, without elaboration or
      qualification, that he had heard this information too; and

      • on or about July 12, 2003, in the late afternoon, Libby spoke by telephone with
      Miller and discussed Wilson’s wife, and that she worked at the CIA.
      The false statement charge in Count Two of the indictment alleges that Libby lied to FBI agents
      on October14 and November 26, 2003, regarding the conversation with Russert on July 10, 2003. Count

      Three charges Libby with making false statements to FBI agents during the same FBI interviews in
      October and November 2003 relating to his July 12, 2003 conversation with Cooper.

      The perjury charge in Count Four alleges that Libby lied while testifying under oath before the
      grand jury on March 5, 2004, about his conversation with Russert on July 10, 2003, because, in fact,
      Russert did not ask Libby if Libby knew that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA, nor did Russert tell
      Libby that all the reporters knew it, and at the time of their conversation, Libby was well aware that
      Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA.

      Count Five charges Libby with perjury before the grand jury for allegedly lying when he said that
      he told reporters that he was telling them what other reporters were saying – first, on March 5, 2004,
      about his conversation with Cooper on or about July 12, 2003, and second, on March 24, 2004, regarding
      conversations with reporters. In fact, Libby well knew that he did not advise Cooper or other reporters
      that he had heard other reporters were saying that Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA, nor did Libby
      advise Cooper or other reporters that he did not know whether this assertion was true.
      If convicted, the crimes charged in the indictment carry the following maximum penalties on
      each count: obstruction of justice – 10 years in prison, and making false statements and perjury –5 years
      in prison, and each count carries a maximum fine of $250,000, making the maximum penalty for
      conviction on all counts 30 years in prison and a $1.25 million fine. Note, however, that the Court
      would determine the appropriate sentence to be imposed.

      The public is reminded that an indictment contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt. The
      defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of
      proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

      # # # #
      Eat Us And Smile

      Cenk For America 2024!!

      Justice Democrats


      "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

      Comment

      • FORD
        ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

        • Jan 2004
        • 58908

        #4
        Scooter was "allegedly" told of Plame's undercover CIA status by an undersecretary of State.

        So the next BCE domino to fall may not be KKKarl or Uncle Dick after all......



        Watch where you point that finger, Fuller brush mustache man.... you're FUCKED!!!
        Eat Us And Smile

        Cenk For America 2024!!

        Justice Democrats


        "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

        Comment

        • BigBadBrian
          TOASTMASTER GENERAL
          • Jan 2004
          • 10625

          #5
          Originally posted by FORD
          Scooter was "allegedly" told of Plame's undercover CIA status by an undersecretary of State.

          So the next BCE domino to fall may not be KKKarl or Uncle Dick after all......



          Watch where you point that finger, Fuller brush mustache man.... you're FUCKED!!!

          "I can tell you that the substantial bulk of the work of this investigation is concluded." - Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald On Friday, 28 October 2005

          “If bullshit was currency, Joe Biden would be a billionaire.” - George W. Bush

          Comment

          • FORD
            ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

            • Jan 2004
            • 58908

            #6
            Of course "this investigation" is concluded. The grand jury expires according to statute. That doesn't mean a "new" investigation won't begin. Fitz very carefully implied as much.
            Eat Us And Smile

            Cenk For America 2024!!

            Justice Democrats


            "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

            Comment

            • Guitar Shark
              ROTH ARMY SUPREME
              • Jan 2004
              • 7579

              #7
              Go easy on ole BBB FORD... he's choking on all that crow.
              ROTH ARMY MILITIA


              Originally posted by EAT MY ASSHOLE
              Sharky sometimes needs things spelled out for him in explicit, specific detail. I used to think it was a lawyer thing, but over time it became more and more evident that he's merely someone's idiot twin.

              Comment

              • Warham
                DIAMOND STATUS
                • Mar 2004
                • 14589

                #8
                Fitzgerald was appointed by John Ashcroft to do this investigation. The majority (ie 99.99%) of the investigation is complete. Read between the lines.

                Comment

                • Cathedral
                  ROTH ARMY ELITE
                  • Jan 2004
                  • 6621

                  #9
                  Hey, how come Tom DeLay isn't required to resign?
                  He's charged with a crime too, so how he keeps his job title is beyond me.

                  I want all scum suckers removed from Washington, NOW!

                  Comment

                  • Warham
                    DIAMOND STATUS
                    • Mar 2004
                    • 14589

                    #10
                    Innocent until proven guilty would probably be DeLay's answer.

                    Comment

                    • Guitar Shark
                      ROTH ARMY SUPREME
                      • Jan 2004
                      • 7579

                      #11
                      Originally posted by Cathedral
                      Hey, how come Tom DeLay isn't required to resign?
                      Technically, Libby wasn't "required" to resign either... it was probably a political decision, to deflect some attention away from the White House.
                      ROTH ARMY MILITIA


                      Originally posted by EAT MY ASSHOLE
                      Sharky sometimes needs things spelled out for him in explicit, specific detail. I used to think it was a lawyer thing, but over time it became more and more evident that he's merely someone's idiot twin.

                      Comment

                      • FORD
                        ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

                        • Jan 2004
                        • 58908

                        #12
                        Originally posted by Cathedral
                        Hey, how come Tom DeLay isn't required to resign?
                        He's charged with a crime too, so how he keeps his job title is beyond me.

                        I want all scum suckers removed from Washington, NOW!
                        DeLay DID resign as the majority leader. I agree he should have to give up his congressional seat entirely, since he was actually arrested and charged, as well as indicted.
                        Eat Us And Smile

                        Cenk For America 2024!!

                        Justice Democrats


                        "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

                        Comment

                        • Warham
                          DIAMOND STATUS
                          • Mar 2004
                          • 14589

                          #13
                          That'd be my guess as well. Take attention away from the VP's office.

                          Comment

                          • FORD
                            ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

                            • Jan 2004
                            • 58908

                            #14
                            Originally posted by Guitar Shark
                            Technically, Libby wasn't "required" to resign either... it was probably a political decision, to deflect some attention away from the White House.
                            And guess what.... Chimpy's going on vacation again! Off to Camp David.....
                            Eat Us And Smile

                            Cenk For America 2024!!

                            Justice Democrats


                            "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

                            Comment

                            • Warham
                              DIAMOND STATUS
                              • Mar 2004
                              • 14589

                              #15
                              Originally posted by FORD
                              DeLay DID resign as the majority leader. I agree he should have to give up his congressional seat entirely, since he was actually arrested and charged, as well as indicted.
                              I think we should find a list of congressmen who were indicted for crimes who kept their seats after the fact. I'm sure you'd find quite a varied list.

                              Comment

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