Hardrock69's Reefhead Madness Thread

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  • FORD
    ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

    • Jan 2004
    • 58888

    Eat Us And Smile

    Cenk For America 2024!!

    Justice Democrats


    "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

    Comment

    • Hardrock69
      DIAMOND STATUS
      • Feb 2005
      • 21888

      Yes, I saw that.

      Der Gestapo do not have much to do these days it seems.

      Comment

      • FORD
        ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

        • Jan 2004
        • 58888

        Eric Holder Says DOJ Will Let Washington, Colorado Marijuana Laws Go Into Effect

        WASHINGTON -- The United States government took a historic step back from its long-running drug war on Thursday, when Attorney General Eric Holder informed the governors of Washington and Colorado that the Department of Justice would allow the states to create a regime that would regulate and implement the ballot initiatives that legalized the use of marijuana for adults.

        A Justice Department official said that Holder told the governors in a joint phone call early Thursday afternoon that the department would take a "trust but verify approach" to the state laws. DOJ is reserving its right to file a preemption lawsuit at a later date, since the states' regulation of marijuana is illegal under the Controlled Substances Act.

        Deputy Attorney General James Cole also issued a three-and-a-half page memo to U.S. attorneys across the country. "The Department's guidance in this memorandum rests on its expectation that states and local governments that have enacted laws authorizing marijuana-related conduct will implement strong and effective regulatory and enforcement systems that will address the threat those state laws could pose to public safety, public health and other law enforcement interests," it reads. "A system adequate to that task must not only contain robust controls and procedures on paper; it must also be effective in practice."

        The memo also outlines eight priorities for federal prosecutors enforcing marijuana laws. According to the guidance, DOJ will still prosecute individuals or entities to prevent:

        the distribution of marijuana to minors;
        revenue from the sale of marijuana from going to criminal enterprises, gangs and cartels;
        the diversion of marijuana from states where it is legal under state law in some form to other states;
        state-authorized marijuana activity from being used as a cover or pretext for the trafficking of other illegal drugs or other illegal activity;
        violence and the use of firearms in the cultivation and distribution of marijuana
        drugged driving and the exacerbation of other adverse public health consequences associated with marijuana use;
        growing of marijuana on public lands and the attendant public safety and environmental dangers posed by marijuana production on public lands;
        preventing marijuana possession or use on federal property.

        The eight high-priority areas leave prosecutors bent on targeting marijuana businesses with a fair amount of leeway, especially the exception for "adverse public health consequences." And prosecutors have shown a willingness to aggressively interpret DOJ guidance in the past, as the many medical marijuana dispensary owners now behind bars can attest.

        U.S. Attorneys will individually be responsible for interpreting the guidelines and how they apply to a case they intend to prosecute. A Justice Department official said, for example, that a U.S Attorney could go after marijuana distributors who used cartoon characters in their marketing because that could be interpreted as attempting to distribute marijuana to minors.

        But the official stressed that the guidance was not optional, and that prosecutors would no longer be allowed to use the sheer volume of sales or the for-profit status of an operation as triggers for prosecution, though these factors could still affect their prosecutorial decisions.

        The Obama administration has struggled with the legalization of medical marijuana in several states. Justice Department Officials had instructed federal prosecutors across the country not to focus federal resources on individuals who were complying with state laws regarding the use of medical marijuana. But the U.S. attorneys in several states that had legalized medical marijuana rebelled, and what was known as the Ogden memo faced stiff resistance from career prosecutors.

        "That's just not what they do,” one former Justice official told HuffPost. “They prosecute people."

        As a result of the internal pushback at DOJ, a new memo was issued by Deputy Attorney General James Cole in 2011 that gave U.S. attorneys more cover to go after medical marijuana distributors. Federal prosecutors began threatening local government officials with prosecution if they went forward with legislation regulating medical cannabis.

        After recreational marijuana initiatives passed in Washington and Colorado in November, President Barack Obama said the federal government had “bigger fish to fry” and would not make going after marijuana users a priority.

        Holder said back in December that the federal response to the passage of the state ballot measures would be coming “relatively soon.”

        Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson told HuffPost his office was preparing for the “worst-case scenario” of a federal lawsuit against the law.

        Eat Us And Smile

        Cenk For America 2024!!

        Justice Democrats


        "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

        Comment

        • FORD
          ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

          • Jan 2004
          • 58888

          So it looks like the "war on weed" is over..... at least in states which passed their own laws with the people saying they want it.
          Eat Us And Smile

          Cenk For America 2024!!

          Justice Democrats


          "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

          Comment

          • PETE'S BROTHER
            DIAMOND STATUS
            • Feb 2007
            • 12678

            Another one of those classic genius posts, sure to generate responses. You log on the next day to see what your witty gem has produced to find no one gets it and 2 knotheads want to stick their dicks in it... Well played, sir!!

            Comment

            • Kristy
              DIAMOND STATUS
              • Aug 2004
              • 16356

              Originally posted by FORD
              So it looks like the "war on weed" is over..... at least in states which passed their own laws with the people saying they want it.
              I'm not sure. There always seems to be another shoe to drop when things go as easy as this.

              Comment

              • FORD
                ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

                • Jan 2004
                • 58888

                Well.... if everybody's busy getting baked, they can't protest the new impending war in Syria. Maybe that has something to do with it?
                Eat Us And Smile

                Cenk For America 2024!!

                Justice Democrats


                "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

                Comment

                • Kristy
                  DIAMOND STATUS
                  • Aug 2004
                  • 16356

                  I doubt it. Syria is going to get the green light for all out war. Problem with Syria is there is no resource the U.S. can exploit except for maybe cheap human slave labor. That won't be for years off.

                  Comment

                  • Hardrock69
                    DIAMOND STATUS
                    • Feb 2005
                    • 21888

                    This is an historic day for cannabis users.

                    It is an historic day for our nation.

                    The Department Of Justice (the lap dog of whoever the current administration is) is saying "If the people of your state vote to make something law....we will not interfere". That is a definite move towards tolerance, and allowing some personal freedom....in an era when our personal freedom is being stripped away....

                    Happy day.

                    Comment

                    • Hardrock69
                      DIAMOND STATUS
                      • Feb 2005
                      • 21888

                      Complete memorandum issued today:



                      August 29, 2013

                      MEMORANDUM FOR ALL UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

                      FROM: James M. Cole
                      Deputy Attorney General

                      SUBJECT: Guidance Regarding Marijuana Enforcement

                      In October 2009 and June 2011, the Department issued guidance to federal prosecutors concerning marijuana enforcement under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This memorandum updates that guidance in light of state ballot initiatives that legalize under state law the possession of small amounts of marijuana and provide for the regulation of marijuana production, processing, and sale. The guidance set forth herein applies to all federal enforcement activity, including civil enforcement and criminal investigations and prosecutions, concerning marijuana in all states.

                      As the Department noted in its previous guidance, Congress has determined that marijuana is a dangerous drug and that the illegal distribution and sale of marijuana is a serious crime that provides a significant source of revenue to large-scale criminal enterprises, gangs, and cartels. The Department of Justice is committed to enforcement of the CSA consistent with those determinations. The Department is also committed to using its limited investigative and prosecutorial resources to address the most significant threats in the most effective, consistent, and rational way. In furtherance of those objectives, as several states enacted laws relating to the use of marijuana for medical purposes, the Department in recent years has focused its efforts on certain enforcement priorities that are particularly important to the federal government:

                      Preventing the distribution of marijuana to minors;
                      Preventing revenue from the sale of marijuana from going to criminal enterprises, gangs, and cartels;
                      Preventing the diversion of marijuana from states where it is legal under state law in some form to other states;
                      Preventing state-authorized marijuana activity from being used as a cover or pretext for the trafficking of other illegal drugs or other illegal activity;
                      Preventing violence and the use of firearms in the cultivation and distribution of marijuana;
                      Preventing drugged driving and the exacerbation of other adverse public health consequences associated with marijuana use;
                      Preventing the growing of marijuana on public lands and the attendant public safety and environmental dangers posed by marijuana production on public lands; and
                      Preventing marijuana possession or use on federal property.

                      These priorities will continue to guide the Department’s enforcement of the CSA against marijuana-related conduct. Thus, this memorandum serves as guidance to Department attorneys and law enforcement to focus their enforcement resources and efforts, including prosecution, on persons or organizations whose conduct interferes with anyone or more of these priorities, regardless of state law.[1]

                      Outside of these enforcement priorities, the federal government has traditionally relied on states and local law enforcement agencies to address marijuana activity through enforcement of their own narcotics laws. For example, the Department of Justice has not historically devoted resources to prosecuting individuals whose conduct is limited to possession of small amounts of marijuana for personal use on private property. Instead, the Department has left such lower-level or localized activity to state and local authorities and has stepped in to enforce the CSA only when the use, possession, cultivation, or distribution of marijuana has threatened to cause one of the harms identified above.

                      The enactment of state laws that endeavor to authorize marijuana production, distribution, and possession by establishing a regulatory scheme for these purposes affects this traditional joint federal-state approach to narcotics enforcement. The Department’s guidance in this memorandum rests on its expectation that states and local governments that have enacted laws authorizing marijuana-related conduct will implement strong and effective regulatory and enforcement systems that will address the threat those state laws could pose to public safety, public health, and other law enforcement interests. A system adequate to that task must not only contain robust controls and procedures on paper; it must also be effective in practice. Jurisdictions that have implemented systems that provide for regulation of marijuana activity must provide the necessary resources and demonstrate the willingness to enforce their laws and regulations in a manner that ensures they do not undermine federal enforcement priorities.

                      In jurisdictions that have enacted laws legalizing marijuana in some form and that have also implemented strong and effective regulatory and enforcement systems to control the cultivation, distribution, sale, and possession of marijuana, conduct in compliance with those laws and regulations is less likely to threaten the federal priorities set forth above. Indeed, a robust system may affirmatively address those priorities by, for example, implementing effective measures to prevent diversion of marijuana outside of the regulated system and to other states, prohibiting access to marijuana by minors, and replacing an illicit marijuana trade that funds criminal enterprises with a tightly regulated market in which revenues are tracked and accounted for. In those circumstances, consistent with the traditional allocation of federal-state efforts in this area, enforcement of state law by state and local law enforcement and regulatory bodies should remain the primary means of addressing marijuana-related activity. If state enforcement efforts are not sufficiently robust to protect against the harms set forth above, the federal government may seek to challenge the regulatory structure itself in addition to continuing to bring individual enforcement actions, including criminal prosecutions, focused on those harms.

                      The Department’s previous memoranda specifically addressed the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in states with laws authorizing marijuana cultivation and distribution for medical use. In those contexts, the Department advised that it likely was not an efficient use of federal resources to focus enforcement efforts on seriously ill individuals, or on their individual caregivers. In doing so, the previous guidance drew a distinction between the seriously ill and their caregivers, on the one hand, and large-scale, for-profit commercial enterprises, on the other, and advised that the latter continued to be appropriate targets for federal enforcement and prosecution. In drawing this distinction, the Department relied on the common-sense judgment that the size of a marijuana operation was a reasonable proxy for assessing whether marijuana trafficking implicates the federal enforcement priorities set forth above.

                      As explained above, however, both the existence of a strong and effective state regulatory system, and an operation’s compliance with such a system, may allay the threat that an operation’s size poses to federal enforcement interests. Accordingly, in exercising prosecutorial discretion, prosecutors should not consider the size or commercial nature of a marijuana operation alone as a proxy for assessing whether marijuana trafficking implicates the Department’s enforcement priorities listed above. Rather, prosecutors should continue to review marijuana cases on a case-by-case basis and weigh all available information and evidence, including, but not limited to, whether the operation is demonstrably in compliance with a strong and effective state regulatory system. A marijuana operation’s large scale or for-profit nature may be a relevant consideration for assessing the extent to which it undermines a particular federal enforcement priority. The primary question in all cases – and in all jurisdictions – should be whether the conduct at issue implicates one or more of the enforcement priorities listed above.

                      As with the Department’s previous statements on this subject, this memorandum is intended solely as a guide to the exercise of investigative and prosecutorial discretion. This memorandum does not alter in any way the Department’s authority to enforce federal law, including federal laws relating to marijuana, regardless of state law. Neither the guidance herein nor any state or local law provides a legal defense to a violation of federal law, including any civil or criminal violation of the CSA. Even in jurisdictions with strong and effective regulatory systems, evidence that particular conduct threatens federal priorities will subject that person or entity to federal enforcement action, based on the circumstances. This memorandum is not intended to, does not, and may not be relied upon to create any rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by any party in any matter civil or criminal. It applies prospectively to the exercise of prosecutorial discretion in future cases and does not provide defendants or subjects of enforcement action with a basis for reconsideration of any pending civil action or criminal prosecution. Finally, nothing herein precludes investigation or prosecution, even in the absence of anyone of the factors listed above, in particular circumstances where investigation and prosecution otherwise serves an important federal interest.

                      [1] These enforcement priorities are listed in general terms; each encompasses a variety of conduct that may merit civil or criminal enforcement of the CSA. By way of example only, the Department’s interest in preventing the distribution of marijuana to minors would call for enforcement not just when an individual or entity sells or transfers marijuana to a minor, but also when marijuana trafficking takes place near an area associated with minors; when marijuana or marijuana-infused products are marketed in a manner to appeal to minors; or when marijuana is being diverted, directly or indirectly, and purposefully or otherwise, to minors.

                      Comment

                      • Eyes of the Night
                        Veteran
                        • Jan 2004
                        • 1993

                        This thread rocks ...
                        Broken down n' dirty dressed in rags ...

                        Comment

                        • FORD
                          ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

                          • Jan 2004
                          • 58888

                          Eat Us And Smile

                          Cenk For America 2024!!

                          Justice Democrats


                          "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

                          Comment

                          • Kristy
                            DIAMOND STATUS
                            • Aug 2004
                            • 16356

                            I'm not okay with the filthy hippies

                            Comment

                            • Hardrock69
                              DIAMOND STATUS
                              • Feb 2005
                              • 21888



                              There are a lot of links to relevant documents and web pages, so if you wanna go deeper on this list, click the link above.

                              An Updated, State-By-State Look at Cannabis Reform Across the U.S.

                              A lot has changed since we last published an overview of cannabis law reform in the U.S., as activists all across the country continue to push the conversation, and policies forward.

                              As we continue onward in a year which has been historic for cannabis reform, here’s an examination of reform occurring across the United States; take note of the fact that the Obama Administration announced today that they won’t overturn cannabis legalization in states that decide to take that approach, such as Colorado and Washington.


                              Alabama:

                              Ron Crumpton, Executive Director of the Alabama Safe Access Project (ASAP), tells us that State Representative Patricia Todd – in collaboration with ASAP – will be filing multiple cannabis reform measures in the upcoming legislative session, including a measure to decriminalize cannabis, a proposal to legalize it entirely, and two proposals to bring protection for medical cannabis patients; one would legalize medical cannabis entirely, and one would provide an affirmative defense for qualified patients

                              Alaska

                              In June the State of Alaska officially certified an initiative to legalize cannabis, passing it through its initial hurdle towards becoming law. Advocates will now need to collect 30,169 valid signatures by next summer to place the proposal – which would legalize cannabis possession, and retail outlets – on next November’s general election ballot.

                              Arizona

                              In May, a Behavior Research Center poll – which shocked the political world in Arizona – found that 56% in the state support the legalization of recreational cannabis (4% above the national average). The next month, an initiative was filed which would do just that; legalize cannabis for those 18 and older, including state-licensed retail outlets.

                              Advocates of the initiative – which, like Colorado’s Amendment 64, is a constitutional amendment – will need to gather roughly 260,000 signatures to put the proposal to a vote of the people in 2014, though they have until Jul 3rd to do so.

                              In July, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled that police must return cannabis seized from an authorized patient from California, setting legal precedent across the state which forces police to abide by the portion of Arizona’s medical cannabis law which recognizes valid patients from other medical cannabis states.

                              Arkansas

                              Earlier this month the state’s attorney general gave approval to a medical cannabis legalization initiative which was filed by Arkansas for Responsible Medicine, giving them the go-ahead to begin collecting signatures to put their proposal to a vote in 2014. Another group has filed a separate initiative, a constitutional amendment which would legalize cannabis possession, cultivation and distribution centers; the proposal awaits approval by the state.

                              Arkansans for Compassionate Care, the proponents of last year’s Issue 5 which would have legalized medical cannabis in Arkansas, but failed narrowly in the election, have also filed a new medical cannabis initiative after being rejected by the attorney general several times in recent weeks, based on “ambiguities” in the language.

                              California

                              Last month California’s Democratic Party – the largest state Democratic Party in the country – approved two cannabis related resolutions, one calling for President Obama to respect state marijuana laws, and one urging state lawmakers to pass legislation protecting medical cannabis safe access. Both are now official platforms of the party.

                              On October 1st activists will begin gathering signatures for the California Cannabis Hemp Act of 2014 (also known as the Jack Herer Initiative), aiming to put it to a vote in 2014; the proposal would fully legalize cannabis possession (12 pounds), private cultivation (99 plants), industrial hemp and cannabis retail outlets.

                              Colorado

                              In May, the state’s governor signed multiple cannabis proposals which made the state the first in history to approve regulations for recreational cannabis. A couple days later, the governor signed a proposal explicitly legalizing hemp in the state.

                              Last week a poll was released which found that 54% of those in Colorado support the legalization of cannabis, showing that support has remained steady since the passage of Amendment 64 in November.

                              Recreational retail outlets are expected to begin opening early next year.

                              Connecticut

                              On August 27th Connecticut’s regulations review committee approved a set of regulations which would allow the state to move forward with its medical cannabis program, which was approved in 2011. Under these new regulations, the state’s first dispensary is expected to open by the spring.

                              Delaware

                              Earlier this month Delaware Governor Jack Markell announced that he would be moving forward with the state’s 2011-approved medical cannabis law (though in scaled-back form, with 1 dispensary rather than 4), which he halted over fears of the federal government prosecuting state employees. This will lead to the state’s first medical cannabis dispensary opening, likely by next year.

                              District of Columbia (U.S. Capital)

                              Last month a proposal was filed in the city’s council which would decriminalize cannabis possession in the district. The proposal – which will be formally voted on next month – is sponsored by a majority of the council, indicating that it will be up to the mayor to decide whether or not the measure passes into law.

                              A few weeks ago Washington D.C.’s first medical cannabis dispensary opened its doors, located just blocks from the White House, with a view of the U.S. Capitol Building.

                              Florida

                              Earlier this month the group United for Care submitted over 100,000 signatures (after only a month of collecting) on their initiative to legalize medical cannabis in the state; the group needed to submit 70,000 to have it reviewed by the state’s supreme court. Once given approval, the group will need to collect roughly 685,000 signatures to put the proposal to a vote in 2014.

                              The leader of the group, attorney and former Obama fundraiser John Morgan, has pledged to do “whatever it takes” to get the initiative passed into law, and plans to spend over $20 million to do so.

                              Georgia

                              Although nothing new has come forward in terms of specific legislation, the nonprofit, pro-legalization group Georgia Campaign for Access, Reform and Education (Georgia C.A.R.E. Project) continues to educate the public in Georgia on the necessity of reforming their state’s failed cannabis policies

                              Hawaii

                              Although the state’s Senate unanimously approved marijuana decriminalization this year, the proposal eventually stalled in the House. However, lawmakers and advocates behind the bill plan to continue to fight for its passage in 2014, and are optimistic about its chances.

                              Idaho

                              The organization Compassionate Idaho – which is now officially a subchapter of Americans for Safe Access – in continuing to work on an initiative aimed at legalizing medical cannabis.



                              Illinois

                              On the first day of this month, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn signed a proposal into law which legalized medical cannabis, including up to 60 state-licensed dispensaries. Although the passage of this law is a giant step forward, advocates continue to fight for further reform, as the restrictive law is only a 4-year starter program.

                              Indiana

                              Senate Bill 0580 – which would have decriminalized the possession of 2 ounces of cannabis – was filed earlier this year by Senator Karen Tallian, though unfortunately no significant progress was made on it in the Senate. However, Senator Tallian plans to refile the proposal next session, and advocates will continue to push for its passage.

                              Iowa

                              H.F. 22, introduced this session, would have legalized the possession and state-licensed sale of medical marijuana to qualified patients, though it was eventually voted down in committee. Regardless of the vote, the bill started a conversation in the state which was much-needed.

                              Kansas

                              Earlier this month a bill to legalize medical cannabis was filed in the Kansas Senate, titled the Cannabis Compassion and Care Act. The measure has been referred to the Public Health and Welfare Committee.

                              Kentucky

                              Last month State Senator Perry Clark introduced a medical cannabis legalization proposal, which had a public hearing on August 21st. This legislation, according to polling released this month, is supported by an overwhelming 78% of Kentucky residents.

                              Louisiana

                              A measure designed to drastically reduce the penalties – and remove mandatory minimums – for cannabis charges was approved in May by the state’s full House, but unfortunately ended up being narrowly rejected by the full Senate the following month. The fight, however, is far from over, as those behind the proposal plan to continue working towards its passage in the upcoming legislative session.

                              Maine

                              In June, legislation to add post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the list of qualifying medical cannabis conditions officially became law in Maine.

                              Last month, an initiative to legalize cannabis was officially sent to the November ballot in Portland, Maine, giving voters the opportunity to reform their city’s marijuana laws

                              Maryland

                              In May the state’s governor signed legislation to allow medical cannabis distribution to occur at certain authorized academic medical centers that become licensed with the state. The passage of the proposal drew mixed reactions, with some calling it a step forward, and others calling it a farce.

                              Massachusetts

                              The State of Massachusetts is moving forward with implementation of its 2012-approved medical cannabis law, and has recently begun accepting applications from those interested in receiving a license to open a medical cannabis dispensary.

                              Michigan

                              In May, the Michigan Supreme Court made an important ruling which protects medical cannabis patients from the state’s zero-tolerance THC driving policy.

                              In June, the nonprofit medical cannabis organization Michigan Compassion became the first cannabis-related organization to receive a Google Grant; the group will be awarded $240,000 in free advertising. Also in June, activists in the cities of Ferndale and Jackson submitted the required number of signatures to put their cannabis decriminalization proposals to a vote this November.

                              In August, a medical cannabis review panel gave preliminary approval to the addition of PTSD as a qualifying medical cannabis condition; a public hearing will be held before a final vote occurs.

                              Earlier this week an initiative to legalize cannabis possession was officially verified for this November’s ballot in Lansing, Michigan’s capital.

                              Minnesota

                              In may legislation was introduced in Minnesota to legalize medical cannabis. The proposal is sponsored by over 40 lawmakers, and although it was filed too late to be approved in 2013, proponents are preparing for a huge push in 2014.

                              Missouri

                              In St. Louis a proposal decriminalizing small amounts of cannabis officially became law on June 1st.

                              In July, a state lawmaker announced that he will be filing two cannabis-related bills in the 2014 session; one to decriminalize up to 35 grams, and one to legalize cannabis similar to Colorado’s Amendment 64.

                              Nebraska

                              Nebraska NORML is currently running an an initiative to legalize cannabis, with the hopes of putting the proposal to a vote in 2014. Those interested in getting involved should e-mail norml@normlne.org.

                              Nevada

                              In June Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed a proposal into law which legalizes medical cannabis dispensaries throughout the state, fixing a huge hole in the law; up until the passage of this proposal, dispensaries were entirely illegal, despite medical cannabis being a constitutional right since 2000, leading most patients to rely on the black-market to obtain their medicine.

                              New Hampshire

                              Last Month New Hampshire officially became the 20th state to legalize medical cannabis, after the governor signed legislation into law.

                              New Mexico

                              Earlier this year the state’s House of Representatives approved a measure which would decriminalize up to a quarter pound of cannabis, making it a simple $100 ticket. Although the measure has stalled in the Senate, it has been an inspiration to activists, and lawmakers will continue to discuss the issue in the next session.

                              New York

                              In June New York’s Assembly approved a measure legalizing medical cannabis; the approval now sits in the Senate, where, according to the bill’s primary sponsor, it has enough support to pass.

                              Earlier this month a federal judge ruled that New York City’s ‘stop-and-frisk’ policy is “unconstitutional”.

                              North Carolina

                              House Bill 637, which would make the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis a simple ticket rather than a criminal misdemeanor, passed its first reading in the house, though stalled in subcommittee. Advocates in the state should contact their lawmakers, urging them to support this common-sense proposal to free-up police resources to focus on serious offenses.

                              Ohio

                              In May the Ohio Ballot Board unanimously approved an initiative to legalize medical cannabis (as well as hemp), sending it through the initial hurdle towards putting it to a vote; advocates will now need to collect roughly 385,000 valid signatures to place the initiative on the 2014 ballot.

                              North Dakota

                              Although there’s not much new to report on, Oklahoma State Senator Constance Johnson continues to consider running an initiative to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

                              Oklahoma

                              Although there’s not much new to report on, Oklahoma State Senator Constance Johnson continues to consider running an initiative to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

                              Oregon

                              In July, Oregon’s governor signed a measure drastically reducing the penalties for most cannabis-related charges, including making the possession of up to an ounce a ticket, rather than a misdemeanor.

                              Just a couple weeks ago the governor signed a proposal legalizing medical cannabis dispensaries, a move which remedies a problem which found medical cannabis legal for qualified patients, despite access points being entirely illegal. Under the regulations set forth in the initiative, over 200 dispensaries are expected to open.

                              Last week advocates of last year’s Measure 80 to legalize cannabis announced that, starting next month, they’ll begin to collect signatures on two new initiatives aiming for the 2014 ballot; one a state-law change, one a constitutional amendment.


                              Pennsylvania

                              In June the NCAAP officially endorsed a proposal in the state’s Senate which would legalize the possession, private home cultivation and state-licensed retail sale of cannabis for adults.

                              Polling released in May found that over 80% in the state support medical cannabis legalization.


                              Rhode Island

                              On April 1st the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis became decriminalized in Rhode Island. In just 4 months – from April 1st to August 1st – nearly 1,000 misdemeanors were avoided because of this new law.

                              South Carolina

                              Members of Columbia NORML are actively lobbying lawmakers in the state in an attempt to bring forth the legalization of cannabis.

                              South Dakota

                              Earlier this year a piece of legislation was introduced and discussed in South Carolina which would have added legal protections to those using cannabis for medical purposes. The bill didn’t advance out of committee, but will be filed again in 2014.

                              Tennessee

                              Tennessee State Senator Frank Nicely is considering drafting legislation to legalize hemp in the state.

                              Texas

                              A few months back Texas lawmakers held a public hearing on House Bill 594, which would have added an “affirmative defense” for patients who possess and use marijuana. The law never advanced beyond that, but began a conversation which is vital to the eventual passage of such measures. Advocates in the state should be constantly communicating with their lawmakers, urging them towards cannabis law reform.

                              Utah

                              A poll released this week found that a large majority in Utah support medical cannabis legalization; 61% to 28%.

                              Vermont

                              On June 6th Vermont’s governor signed a proposal decriminalizing cannabis possession – the law took effect on July 1st. Also in July, the state’s first medical cannabis dispensary opened its doors for qualifying patients.

                              Washington

                              The state’s Liquor Control Board continues to finalize regulations for the newly-legal recreational cannabis industry, with retail outlets to be licensed by the end of the year.

                              In the meantime, the nonprofit organization Sensible Washington is working on legislation that they plan to have filed in the upcoming legislative session which would defelonize the possession of all drugs (when not intended for distribution), making the charges misdemeanors rather than felonies (in Washington State the possession of any amount of a controlled substance, or over 40 grams of cannabis a felony with a maximum sentence of 5 years in prisons). So far the effort has at least 4 legislative cosponsors.

                              West Virginia

                              House Bill 2961, sponsored by 10 state legislators, would allow qualifying patients in the state (as well as their caregiver) to purchase, grow and possess cannabis. The measure would allow patients to grow up to 12 plants, and would also legalize dispensaries. Although the proposal stalled in committee, advocates plan to continue building support for the proposal.

                              Wisconsin

                              Several lawmakers in Wisconsin are in the process of drafting legislation to legalize medical cannabis, which they plan to introduce in the upcoming session.

                              Wyoming

                              Earlier this month the newly-formed Wyoming NORML announced an initiative campaign to put a cannabis legalization initiative on the 2016 ballot. The group will need to collect roughly 37,000 signatures to do so.

                              Comment

                              • FORD
                                ROTH ARMY MODERATOR

                                • Jan 2004
                                • 58888

                                Eat Us And Smile

                                Cenk For America 2024!!

                                Justice Democrats


                                "If the American people had ever known the truth about what we (the BCE) have done to this nation, we would be chased down in the streets and lynched." - Poppy Bush, 1992

                                Comment

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